Controlling Your High Blood Pressure

Are Immunization Exclusion Days Fair?

Immunizations have become somewhat controversial ever since a small (but vocal) group of people declared them dangerous to children. As a result, school districts and states across the country have had to create “exclusion days” to protect the rest of their student body. Are these exclusion days fair or exclusionary? What Are Exclusion Days? Exclusion days are deadlines that schools set for children to receive immunization. While they aren’t present in every state, those that do have them require that children be up-to-date with all their immunization shots. This is true of all child care facilities, including: Head Start Preschool Private schools Public schools In 2015, local health departments in Oregon sent almost 30,000 letters to parents, reminding them to immunize their children. And when exclusion day came, almost 5,000 children were forced to stay out of school, until they had received their proper immunization. Why Do They Exist? Exclusion days are designed to protect children from dangerous diseases that may be spread by children who have not been immunized. To some parents, it may feel like a cruel or exclusionary act: others support it, because they don’t want their children getting sick. They believe that immunizations help keep children from: Spreading disease Catching dangerous diseases Experiencing the full-brunt of other diseases Immunizations are also designed to help protect childcare workers from disease. However, some continue to argue that there are untested or even proven dangers in immunizations. Is that true? Are There Dangers In Immunizations? The danger potential of immunization has been greatly exaggerated and thankfully, the belief that immunization causes autism has been busted, many times. The...

Spot The Differences: Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, it is imperative to understand the distinctions between type 1 and type 2 diabetes in order to understand what is entailed to manage the condition effectively. There are numerous similarities that the two types share, but there are also some notable differences.    Diabetes Defined Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder of the endocrine system in which the pancreas either does not produce adequate levels of insulin or the body is unable to utilize the insulin produced, resulting in high levels of glucose in the blood. Insulin is a hormone that is necessary for the conversion of glucose into the energy needed for optimal cellular function. When the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin, or when the cells are unable to make the conversion, the glucose level builds up in the bloodstream. Two types of diabetes mellitus are known as type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Key differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes distinguish the cause and prevalence and include: In patients with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not produce insulin. Type 1 diabetes is essentially an autoimmune condition in which the body’s immune system attacks the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, rendering them nonproductive. In patients with type 2 diabetes, the pancreas produces insulin, but the amount of insulin may be insufficient, or the body’s cells do not respond to process the insulin adequately for regulating blood glucose levels. According to the American Diabetes Association, type 1 diabetes accounts for five percent of diagnosed cases of diabetes mellitus. Type 2 diabetes is far more...

Moody, Anxious, And Depressed? How To Recognize And Treat Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

Whether you get it a little or a lot, you’ve definitely felt the effects of premenstrual syndrome — or PMS, for short. But there’s a small subset of the female population — about 3 to 8%, as opposed to the 75% who suffer from PMS — for whom PMS has evolved into something a little more serious: premenstrual dysphoric disorder, also referred to as PMDD. But what are the signs and symptoms of PMDD, and how do you know how to treat it, if you’ve got it? If you’re wondering how you can help yourself with premenstrual dysphoric disorder, then here’s what you need to know. What Exactly Is Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, and How Does It Differ From Premenstrual Syndrome? PMDD is your body’s extreme reaction to your menstrual cycle. No one’s quite sure why it affects some people and not others, or what exact processes in the body are responsible for it, but its effects are both severe and, at times, completely debilitating. This is the main difference between PMS and PMDD; while similar symptoms (see below) can present in both conditions, PMDD is much more intense and can easily end up damaging your personal relationships. PMS tends to be lighter and go away more quickly — lasting for a few days before your period and a day or two into it, where PMDD can start a week or more before your cycle actually starts. What Are The Signs of PMDD? Bloating, tenderness in the breast area, and changes in your sleep cycle are just a few of the symptoms of PMDD. The large, defining symptoms, however are...

About Me

High blood pressure is nothing to ignore. Many people suffer from controllable high blood pressure but don’t follow the orders that their primary care doctor has given them. It wasn’t until I understood how important managing my blood pressure was that I started taking care of myself the way that I need to. This blog is all about high blood pressure. You will learn about foods that can help manage it, the treatments that your doctor may recommend and how it can have devastating results if you don’t do anything to control the increase in your blood pressure each day.